Georgia Governor Admits “Wastefulness,” Prays For Rain

A record-breaking drought in the Southwest has been rather inconvenient for traditionalists. John Christy, state climatologist of Alabama and a global warming minimizer, has been forced to insist that the drought has nothng to do with global warming.

"Rainfall patterns by their nature are variable. This is just where (the drought) happens to be this time," he said in July.

And yesterday, Georgia governor Sonny Purdue went outside to pray for rain — and, implicitly, admit fault. As recounted in a thorough piece in the Los Angeles Times (sub. required):

Bowing his head outside the Georgia Capitol on Tuesday, Gov. Sonny
Perdue cut a newly repentant figure as he publicly prayed for rain to
end the region’s historic drought.

"Oh father, we acknowledge our wastefulness," Perdue said.

Purdue was joined by hundreds of Georgians, most of whom saw his repentance as a desire to unify the state. Not all were so forgiving.

Lance Warner, 22, a history student at Georgia State University,
smirked as members of the crowd stretched their arms to the heavens and
cried "Amen!" and "Hallelujah!"

"You couldn’t make this up," he said. "You can’t make up for years of water mismanagement with a prayer session. It’s lunacy!"

"Mismanagement?"

Wait — Lance, are you saying the drought has nothing to do with how a distant bearded father figure in the sky feels about us?

Meanwhile Atlanta’s Lake Sydney Lanier continues to decline — ninety days supply left.

(Thanks to Flickr’s Duckshoot for sharing.)

Lakesydneylanier

4 thoughts on “Georgia Governor Admits “Wastefulness,” Prays For Rain

  1. I’m glad you finally made a mention of the goings on in the southeast U.S. It may be our first in a series of real-time experiments in what do we do in a major city when the water actually runs out. Climate expert Kevin Trenberth says global warming does not cause droughts–but it makes them worse.

    Like

  2. Yes, you are right, Brad. We need “a series of real-time experiments in what do we do in a major city when the water actually runs out.”

    We need lots of dry runs so to speak, to get people ready for what will likely come NEXT, well, in 100 or 200 or 500 years. Now is a good time to have some test runs like this. Yes.

    Like

  3. Yes, you are right, Brad. We need “a series of real-time experiments in what do we do in a major city when the water actually runs out.”

    We need lots of dry runs so to speak, to get people ready for what will likely come NEXT, well, in 100 or 200 or 500 years. Now is a good time to have some test runs like this. Yes.

    Like

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